The Government of Haiti recognizes the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement

The Government of Haiti recognizes the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement

In the framework of the seventh anniversary of the earthquake in Haiti, Haiti's government recognized the work done by the humanitarian organizations that were present to support the response and reconstruction actions.


On January 12, 2010, an earthquake considered one of the worst disasters in Haiti in recent years left behind 200,000 people dead and 2 million displaced.


To pay tribute to those who lost their lives during this earthquake and to make this a reminder of the importance of working to reduce risk and vulnerabilities in the most disadvantaged communities, President of the Republic of Haiti, Jocelerme Privert, decreed January 12, as a day for reflection and action on risk reduction.

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Human+Kind: Chuy's Story

Human+Kind: Chuy's Story

Chuy — I joined the Marines because I wanted to change my life. I thought it would help me be something and become a man. 

Unfortunately, while in the Marines, I had an accident. I fell off a truck in Puerto Rico. The whole platoon was in the truck and we were going back to base. I hit my head. I lost my memory. I was in a coma for almost a month, I couldn’t remember anything. I hurt my shoulder, my knees were banged up and I was on crutches. I was lost.

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This Week in Restoring Family Links: 1/10/17- 1/11/17

This Week in Restoring Family Links: 1/10/17- 1/11/17

Philippines: The Philippine Red Cross is preparing to provide assistance following Traslacion or the Black Nazarene procession. Black Nazarene is an icon and many Filipinos believe in its ability to cure disease just by touching it. Every year it attracts many people with this year having millions of expected people. Traslacion is the largest procession and attracts many devotees. It can last as long as twenty hours.

 

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There is no time to think. You have to move

There is no time to think. You have to move

Syrians Nazeh, Mirvat and their three children fled their homeland in 2012, literally running for their lives and being shot at as they boarded a bus for Lebanon.

They realised their lives were in danger when father Nazeh was accused of supporting one side of the conflict by helping injured civilians at a makeshift hospital in his home.

“You cannot stop and think, there is no time to think. You have to move,” he says.

When they fled they grabbed just what they could carry, leaving everything else behind, including family, friends, home and businesses.

After two and a half years in Thailand, where Mirvat worked as an Arabic teacher, the family was accepted to New Zealand under the refugee quota.

Sitting in their Wellington living room, drinking homemade cardamom coffee, a Syrian specialty, Mirvat tells of her relief. After some online research, she knew they would find safety in New Zealand.

“I thought if they have 40 million sheep, we are safe,” she explains.

 

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