Human+Kind: Juan's story

Human+Kind: Juan's story

I have been in Tijuana for 10 months since I was deported. I volunteer at the shelter. I guard the front door. I have seen people that have been deported from the United States, as well as people who have migrated from the south on their way north.

I have family in the United States, a young son. I’ve received a lifetime ban from re-entering. So, I’m here for the time being and, while I’m here, I’m taking classes [at the shelter] to complete my high school education. I’m also studying computers. I put together my first PowerPoint presentation on sea turtles who are at risk of extinction.

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This Week in Restoring Family Links 4/25/2016 - 4/29/2016

This Week in Restoring Family Links 4/25/2016 - 4/29/2016

Ecuador: Ecuador is still reeling from the 7.8 magnitude earthquake that struck the coast on April 16, which has caused 655  deaths and about 4,600 critically injuries. both of which continue to climb as rescue crews search and pull people from the rubble. The capital of Quito did not report extensive damage, but six coastal provinces have been placed under a state of emergency. Much of these provinces' infrastructure is severely damaged, and thousands are still left stranded without reliable communication, aid supplies, or running water. The Ecuadorian government has deployed 10,000 armed forces members to these provinces to set up temporary shelters and hospitals. 

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This Week in Restoring Family Links News 2/15/2016 - 2/19/2016

This Week in Restoring Family Links News 2/15/2016 - 2/19/2016

On Wednesday, the Pope completed a six-day trip to Mexico by praying at the U.S.-Mexico border in the city of Ciudad Juarez. Before celebrating mass at a fairground, the Pontifex paid a visit to the border fence to pray for those who lost their lives on the perilous journey North, alongside a giant metal cross meant to commemorate them.  In attendance were tens of thousands, many of whom crossed the border from El Paso, Texas to hear the Pope speak. 

During his homily, he called for those listening to have open hearts and recognize the exploitation that drives many to flee their homelands. "We cannot deny the humanitarian crisis" the pope stated, in reference to the thousands of migrants who "are being expelled by poverty and violence, drug trafficking and organized crime". The city of Ciudad Juarez is a pivotal crossing for those trying to reach the United States, and has recently been plagued by drug and migration-related violence. The pope offered words of inspiration to youth to avoid drug trafficking, and took a swipe at Mexico's powerful and corrupt: "the flow of capital cannot decide the flow of people".

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This Week in Restoring Family Links News 1/11/16 — 11/15/16

This Week in Restoring Family Links News 1/11/16 — 11/15/16

This past Monday, long-awaited relief finally came to Madaya, a remote Syrian town on the outskirts of Damascus where more than two dozen people have starved in the past two weeks as a result of humanitarian blocking from pro-government forces. The last time Madaya received any form of aid was October 18, driving residents into such desperation that many have been trying to survive off of grass, leaves, and boiled water.   Madaya has garnered an immense international response, with many prominent figures speaking out about the state of horror there. UN Secratary-General Ban Ki-Moon on Thursday called the use of starvation as a weapon a "war crime", and relayed reports from UN teams that the residents of Madaya were "little more than skin and bones: gaunt, severely malnourished, so weak they could barely walk"

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Humanitarian Action across Borders: Part 3

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The final part of our coverage of the migration conference features a panel discussion on missing migrants, the closing keynote presentation by photojournalist Encarni Pindado, and final remarks made by American Red Cross Restoring Family Links Caseworker, Nadia Kalinchuk.

The panel on missing migrants highlights the work of organizations and individuals to find and identify missing migrants and support the families of the missing in Guatemala, Honduras, and along the US-Mexico border. The discussion highlights both the difficulty and the importance of this work - especially when looking at the issue from a "Restoring Family Links" perspective as many families have gone months, years, and even decades without knowing the fate of their loved ones. While the dedication and work of these and many other organizations and volunteer groups helps find and identify many missing migrants, the panel highlights the policy changes needed across the region to avert this humanitarian crisis and bring justice and closure to families of the missing. The panel includes Fredy Peccerelli from Fundacion de Antropologia Forense de Guatemala, Robin Reineke from Colibri Center, Adrienne Pine from American University, and Robert Conrad from the American Red Cross.

The closing keynote presentation by Encarni Pindado focused on her work as a photojournalist, documenting the lives and journeys of migrants in Mexico. Her latest project, Migrazoom, provided cameras and training to migrants, who then documented their own stories through photography. The photo essays are a moving depiction of the protection needs of migrants.

The final remarks made by Nadia Kalinchuk highlighted the importance of all the work being done by the represented organizations and individuals.