This Week in Restoring Family Links: 12/27/16-12/28/16

Sophia Fredericks, Social Engagement Intern, National Headquarters Washington D.C. 

Volunteers of the Philippine Red Cross providing meals to evacuees. Photo credit: Philippine Red Cross

Volunteers of the Philippine Red Cross providing meals to evacuees. Photo credit: Philippine Red Cross

Philippines: The Philippine Red Cross has been providing aid following the effects of Typhoon Nock-Ten. The typhoon caused as many as 400,000 people to be displaced and people have been forced to seek refuge in places such as public buildings or schools. Volunteers of the Red Cross have been working to provide basic necessities to those affected, as many as 3,000 people were provided meals by the Red Cross so far. The Chairman of the Philippine Red Cross Richard Gordon spoke out about the disaster and said “ is important to remember that in recent months, the country has been struck by four major typhoons and it is often the same people who get hit each time by these storms. They become increasingly vulnerable and need extra support to recover.”

Typhoon Nock-Ten or more locally known as Nina was a category four and posed risks to high risk structures as well as various types of plantations that many people rely on. There are also fears that Manila, the capital of the Philippines, will face flooding which is an area with a dense population. Hospitals are working to prioritize caring for people affected by this typhoon which means that surgeons and other doctors specializing in emergencies or trauma are currently unable to take leave and must remain on duty.

Somali: Somali children currently residing in IDP camps may be vulnerable to malnutrition. Meyum Abdullahi Gure, a Nutrition Programme Officer with Save the Children, said “We receive around 15 to 20 cases every day. These include five to seven cases of severe acute malnutrition with complications, which are so serious that we cannot treat them here. We send them to the Stabilization Centre to be admitted,” It is found that malnutrition in IDP camps occurs as a result of a lack of basic necessities such as sanitation or clean drinking water which results in diarrhea and an inability of children to retain nutrients. This ultimately results in malnutrition.

Somali mothers receiving nutrition peanut paste to help their malnourished children. Photo Credit: UNICEF/Somali/2016/Makundi

Somali mothers receiving nutrition peanut paste to help their malnourished children. Photo Credit: UNICEF/Somali/2016/Makundi

It is found that there are so far 1.1 million IDPs in Somalia. The Infant and Young Child Feeding Programme is being used by UNICEF in order to prevent malnutrition. This Programme works to treat children who have succumbed to malnutrition. It also educates mothers on the importance of nutrition, hygiene and breastfeeding. Educating these mothers on hygiene holds great importance in preventing malnutrition among children. It is found that so far, 50,000 Somali children have been saved from malnutrition thanks to the European Commission’s Humanitarian Aid Department who have funded outpatient and stabilization centers.